California Dreamin | Nature Photography From The Golden State

Here is a collection of fine art abstract and nature photography from the great State of California | California is bordered by Oregon to the north, Nevada and Arizona to the east, and the Mexican state of Baja California to the south (with the coast being on the west). The state's diverse geography ranges from the Pacific Coast in the west to the Sierra Nevada mountain range in the east, and from the redwoodDouglas firforests in the northwest to the Mojave Desert in the southeast. The Central Valley, a major agricultural area, dominates the state's center. Although California is well-known for its warm Mediterranean climate, the large size of the state results in climates that vary from moist temperate rainforest in the north to arid desert in the interior, as well as snowy alpine in the mountains. Over time, drought and wildfires have become more pervasive features.

Death Valley, furnace creek, photo

Convergence Zone

Fine Art Limited Edition of 50 - Death Valley is an excellent example of a graben, or a downdropped block of land between two mountain ranges. It lies at the southern end of a geological trough known as Walker Lane, which runs north to Oregon. The valley is bisected by a right lateral strike slip fault system, represented by the Death Valley Faultand the Furnace Creek Fault. The eastern end of the left lateral Garlock Fault intersects the Death Valley Fault. Furnace Creek and the Amargosa River flow through the valley but eventually disappear into the sands of the valley floor.

fine art, limited edition, Mobius Arch, Lone Pine, California, , photo

Song Of The String

Fine Art Limited Edition of 50 - The Möbius strip or Möbius band (UK: /ˈmɜːbiəs/, US: /ˈmoʊ-, ˈmeɪ-/; German: [ˈmøːbi̯ʊs]), also spelled Mobius or Moebius, is a surface with only one side (when embedded in three-dimensional Euclidean space) and only one boundary. The Möbius strip has the mathematical property of being unorientable. It can be realized as a ruled surface. Its discovery is attributed to the German mathematicians August Ferdinand Möbius and Johann Benedict Listing in 1858, though a structure similar to the Möbius strip can be seen in Roman mosaics dated circa 200–250 AD.

Zabriskie, Death Valley, Geology, Sediments, Black Mountain, Ancient, Fine Art, National Park, , photo

The Sands Of Time

Fine Art Limited Edition of 50 - Millions of years prior to the actual sinking and widening of Death Valley and the existence of Lake Manly (see Geology of the Death Valley area), another lake covered a large portion of Death Valley including the area around Zabriskie Point. This ancient lake began forming approximately nine million years ago. During several million years of the lake's existence, sediments were collecting at the bottom in the form of saline muds, gravels from nearby mountains, and ashfalls from the then-active Black Mountain volcanic field. These sediments combined to form what we today call the Furnace Creek Formation.

Fine Art, Limited Edition, Yosemite National Park, Reflection, Merced, River, Yosemite Valley, California,, photo

Golden

Fine Art Limited Edition of 100 - The Merced River (/mɜːrˈsɛd/), in the central part of the U.S. state of California, is a 145-mile (233 km)-long tributary of the San Joaquin River flowing from the Sierra Nevada into the San Joaquin Valley. It is most well known for its swift and steep course through the southern part of Yosemite National Park, where it is the primary watercourse flowing through Yosemite Valley. The river's character changes dramatically once it reaches the plains of the agricultural San Joaquin Valley, where it becomes a slow-moving meandering stream.

Mossbrae, Falls, Waterfall, California, Shasta, Fine Art, Rain, Limited Edition, , photo

Rain

Fine Art Limited Edition of 200 - Mossbrae Falls is a waterfall flowing into the Sacramento River, in the Shasta Cascade area in Dunsmuir, California. The falls are located just south of the lower portion of Shasta Springs. Access to the falls via a mile-long hiking trail on the Union Pacific Railroad tracks is currently closed, as Union Pacific and the City of Dunsmuir figure out a safer route to the falls.

Fine Art, Limited Edition, Mesquite Dunes, Death Valley, National Park, Shadow Stories, Dunes, California, , photo

Shadow Stories

Fine Art Limited Edition of 200 - 

The Mesquite Flat Sand Dunes are at the northern end of the valley floor and are nearly surrounded by mountains on all sides. Due to their easy access from the road and the overall proximity of Death Valley to Hollywood, these dunes have been used to film sand dune scenes for several movies including films in the Star Warsseries. The largest dune is called Star Dune and is relatively stable and stationary because it is at a point where the various winds that shape the dunes converge. The depth of the sand at its crest is 130–140 feet (40–43 m) but this is small compared to other dunes in the area that have sand depths of up to 600–700 feet (180–210 m) deep.

The primary source of the dune sands is probably the Cottonwood Mountains which lie to the north and northwest. The tiny grains of quartz and feldspar that form the sinuous sculptures that make up this dune field began as much larger pieces of solid rock.

Yosemite, National Park Clouds, Fog,, photo

The Sound Of Silence

Fine Art Limited Edition of 100 - The geology of the Yosemite area is characterized by granitic rocks and remnants of older rock. About 10 million years ago, the Sierra Nevada was uplifted and then tilted to form its relatively gentle western slopes and the more dramatic eastern slopes. The uplift increased the steepness of stream and river beds, resulting in formation of deep, narrow canyons. About one million years ago, snow and ice accumulated, forming glaciers at the higher alpine meadows that moved down the river valleys. Ice thickness in Yosemite Valley may have reached 4,000 feet (1,200 m) during the early glacial episode. The downslope movement of the ice masses cut and sculpted the U-shaped valley that attracts so many visitors to its scenic vistas today.

Fine Art, Limited Edition, Aaron Reed Photography, Zabriskie Point, Death Valley National Park, Furnace Creek, California, , photo

Worlds Of Wonder

Fine Art Limited Edition of 100 - A series of Native American groups inhabited the area from as early as 7000 BC, most recently the Timbisha around 1000 AD who migrated between winter camps in the valleys and summer grounds in the mountains. A group of European-Americans that became stuck in the valley in 1849 while looking for a shortcut to the gold fields of California gave the valley its name, even though only one of their group died there. Several short-lived boom towns sprang up during the late 19th and early 20th centuries to mine gold and silver. The only long-term profitable ore to be mined was borax, which was transported out of the valley with twenty-mule teams. The valley later became the subject of books, radio programs, television series, and movies. Tourism blossomed in the 1920s, when resorts were built around Stovepipe Wells and Furnace Creek. Death Valley National Monument was declared in 1933 and the park was substantially expanded and became a national park in 1994.

fine art, limited edition, landscape, Majesty, Mount Whitney, Lone Pine, California, , photo

Her Majesty

Fine Art Limited Edition of 50 - Mount Whitney is the tallest mountain in California, as well as the highest summit in the contiguous United States and the Sierra Nevada—with an elevation of 14,505 feet (4,421 m). It is in Central California, on the boundary between California's Inyo and Tulare counties, 84.6 miles (136.2 km)[8] west-northwest of the lowest point in North America at Badwater Basin in Death Valley National Park at 282 ft (86 m) below sea level. The west slope of the mountain is in Sequoia National Park and the summit is the southern terminus of the John Muir Trail which runs 211.9 mi (341.0 km) from Happy Isles in Yosemite Valley.

fine art, limited edition, Badwater Basin, Death Valley, California, , photo

The Flats

Fine Art Limited Edition of 50 - Badwater Basin is an endorheic basin in Death Valley National Park, Death Valley, Inyo County, California, noted as the lowest point in North America, with a depth of 282 ft (86 m) below sea level. Mount Whitney, the highest point in the contiguous 48 United States, is only 84.6 miles (136 km) to the northwest.

The site itself consists of a small spring-fed pool of "bad water" next to the road in a sink; the accumulated salts of the surrounding basin make it undrinkable, thus giving it the name. The pool does have animal and plant life, including pickleweed, aquatic insects, and the Badwater snail.

Adjacent to the pool, where water is not always present at the surface, repeated freeze–thaw and evaporation cycles gradually push the thin salt crust into hexagonal honeycomb shapes.

fine art, abstract, pastel, photo

Pastel Paradise

Fine Art Limited Edition of 50 - Pastels or pastel colors belong to a pale family of colors, which, when described in the HSV color space, have high value and low to intermediate saturation. The name comes from pastels, art media characteristic of this color family. The colors of this family are usually described as "soothing", "soft", "near neutral", "milky", "washed out", "desaturated", and lacking strong chromatic content.

Death Valley, California, , photo

Rollercoaster

Fine Art Limited Edition of 50 - In earth science, erosion is the action of surface processes (such as water flow or wind) that removes soil, rock, or dissolved material from one location on the Earth's crust, and then transports it to another location (not to be confused with weathering which involves no movement). This natural process is caused by the dynamic activity of erosive agents, that is, water, ice (glaciers), snow, air (wind), plants, animals, and humans.

fine art, limited edition, Frozen, Time, Death Valley, California,, photo

Frozen In Time

Fine Art Limited Edition of 50 - A drop or droplet is a small column of liquid, bounded completely or almost completely by free surfaces. A drop may form when liquid accumulates at the lower end of a tube or other surface boundary, producing a hanging drop called a pendant drop. Drops may also be formed by the condensation of a vapor or by atomizationof a larger mass of liquid.

Mesquite, Dunes, Sand, Death Valley, Fine Art, Limited Edition, California, National Park, , photo

Sea Of Sand

Fine Art Limited Edition of 200 - The Mesquite Flat Sand Dunes are at the northern end of the valley floor and are nearly surrounded by mountains on all sides. Due to their easy access from the road and the overall proximity of Death Valley to Hollywood, these dunes have been used to film sand dune scenes for several movies including films in the Star Warsseries. The largest dune is called Star Dune and is relatively stable and stationary because it is at a point where the various winds that shape the dunes converge. The depth of the sand at its crest is 130–140 feet (40–43 m) but this is small compared to other dunes in the area that have sand depths of up to 600–700 feet (180–210 m) deep.

fine art, landscape, limited edition, Zabriskie Point, Death Valley, California, Wonder, photo

Butterfly Effect

Fine Art Limited Edition of 50 - Millions of years prior to the actual sinking and widening of Death Valley and the existence of Lake Manly (see Geology of the Death Valley area), another lake covered a large portion of Death Valley including the area around Zabriskie Point. This ancient lake began forming approximately nine million years ago. During several million years of the lake's existence, sediments were collecting at the bottom in the form of saline muds, gravels from nearby mountains, and ashfalls from the then-active Black Mountainvolcanic field. These sediments combined to form what we today call the Furnace Creek Formation.

Mudcrack, Crack, Fine Art, Limited Edition, Death Valley National Park, California, photo

The Broken And Discarded

Fine Art Limited Edition of 50 - Naturally occurring mudcracks form in sediment that was once saturated with water. Abandoned river channels, floodplain muds, and dried ponds are localities that form mudcracks. Mudcracks can also be indicative of a predominately sunny or shady environment of formation. Rapid drying, which occurs in sunny environments, results in widely spaced, irregular mudcracks, while closer spaced, more regular mudcracks indicate that they were formed in a shady place. Similar features also occur in frozen ground, lava flows (as columnar basalt), and igneous dykes and sills.

Zabriskie Point, Death Valley, Mud, Sediment, Abstract, Salt, Water, Erosion, Fine Art, Limited Edition, Geology, California, Volcanic, , photo

Salt Water Taffy

Fine Art Limited Edition of 50 - Millions of years prior to the actual sinking and widening of Death Valley and the existence of Lake Manly (see Geology of the Death Valley area), another lake covered a large portion of Death Valley including the area around Zabriskie Point. This ancient lake began forming approximately nine million years ago. During several million years of the lake's existence, sediments were collecting at the bottom in the form of saline mudsgravels from nearby mountains, and ashfalls from the then-active Black Mountain volcanic field. These sediments combined to form what we today call the Furnace Creek Formation. The climate along Furnace Creek Lake was dry, but not nearly as dry as in the present.

Lone Cypress, California, Pebble Beach, Cypress Tree, 17 mile drive, fine art, limited edition, , photo

Mr. Lonely

Fine Art Limited Edition of 50 - The Lone Cypress is a Monterey cypress tree in Pebble Beach, California. Standing on a granite hillside off the 17-Mile Drive, the tree is a Western icon, and has been called one of the most photographed trees in North America. It is located between Cypress Point Golf Course and the Pebble Beach Golf Links, two of world's best-known golf courses. Possibly as old as 250 years, the cypress has been scarred by fire and has been held in place with cables for 65 years.

Death Valley, Fine Art, Limited Edition, Abstract, Zabriskie, California, Erosion, Sediment, Earth, National Park, , photo

Watercolors

Fine Art Limited Edition of 50 - The exposed geology of the Death Valley area presents a diverse and complex set of at least 23 formations of sedimentary units, two major gaps in the geologic record called unconformities, and at least one distinct set of related formations geologists call a group. The oldest rocks in the area that now includes Death Valley National Park are extensively metamorphosed by intense heat and pressure and are at least 1700 million years old. These rocks were intruded by a mass of granite 1400 Ma (million years ago) and later uplifted and exposed to nearly 500 million years of erosion.

fine art, limited edition, dune, Death Valley, California , photo

The Wind In Waves

Fine Art Limited Edition of 50 - In physical geography, a dune is a hill of loose sand built by aeolian processes (wind) or the flow of water. Dunes occur in different shapes and sizes, formed by interaction with the flow of air or water. Most kinds of dunes are longer on the stoss (upflow) side, where the sand is pushed up the dune, and have a shorter "slip face" in the lee side. The valley or trough between dunes is called a slack. A "dune field" or erg is an area covered by extensive dunes.

Fine Art, Limited Edition, Death Valley, Zabriskie Point, Aaron Reed, Abstract, Erosion, Time, , photo

Liquid Rainbows

Fine Art Limited Edition of 50 - The hot, dry climate makes it difficult for soil to form. Mass wasting, the down-slope movement of loose rock, is therefore the dominant erosive force in mountainous area, resulting in "skeletonized" ranges (mountains with very little soil on them).

Fine Art, Limited Edition, Zabriskie Point, Death Valley, Mountains, California, Range, Steep, Arid, , photo

Stuck In The Middle With You

Fine Art Limited Edition of 200 - Uplift of surrounding mountain ranges and subsidence of the valley floor are both occurring. The uplift on the Black Mountains is so fast that the alluvial fans (fan-shaped deposits at the mouth of canyons) there are small and steep compared to the huge alluvial fans coming off the Panamint Range. Fast uplift of a mountain range in an arid environment often does not allow its canyons enough time to cut a classic V-shape all the way down to the stream bed. Instead, a V-shape ends at a slot canyon halfway down, forming a 'wine glass canyon.' Sediment is deposited on a small and steep alluvial fan.

Zabriskie Point, Death Valley, National Park, Fine Art, Limited Edition, California, , photo

Ripples In Time

Fine Art Limited Edition of 50 - Millions of years prior to the actual sinking and widening of Death Valley and the existence of Lake Manly (see Geology of the Death Valley area), another lake covered a large portion of Death Valley including the area around Zabriskie Point. This ancient lake began forming approximately nine million years ago. During several million years of the lake's existence, sediments were collecting at the bottom in the form of saline mudsgravels from nearby mountains, and ashfalls from the then-active Black Mountain volcanic field. These sediments combined to form what we today call the Furnace Creek Formation. The climate along Furnace Creek Lake was dry, but not nearly as dry as in the present. Camelsmastodonshorsescarnivores, and birds left tracks in the lakeshore muds, along with fossilized grass and reedsBorates, which made up a large portion of Death Valley's historical past were concentrated in the lakebeds from hot spring waters and alteration of rhyolite in the nearby volcanic field. Weathering and alteration by thermal waters are also responsible for the variety of colors represented there.

California, Merced River, Yosemite, Valley, Fine Art, Limited Edition, , photo

The Lazy River

Fine Art Limited Edition of 100 - The Merced River (/mɜːrˈsɛd/), in the central part of the U.S. state of California, is a 145-mile (233 km)-long tributary of the San Joaquin River flowing from the Sierra Nevada into the San Joaquin Valley. It is most well known for its swift and steep course through the southern part of Yosemite National Park, where it is the primary watercourse flowing through Yosemite Valley. The river's character changes dramatically once it reaches the plains of the agricultural San Joaquin Valley, where it becomes a slow-moving meandering stream.